Pc1144 Assignment

Level 1 Modules

CodeTitleMCSem ISem IISp Sem

COT2001

Computational Thinking for Scientists

4

-

LAI Choy Heng & NG Siow Yee

-

PC1141

Introduction to Classical Mechanics

4

WANG Qinghai

-

-

PC1142

Introduction to Thermodynamics and Optics

4

Peter HO

-

-

PC1143

Introduction to Electricity & Magnetism

4

-

Kenneth HONG Chong Ming

-

PC1144

Introduction to Modern Physics

4

-

YEO Ye

-

PC1221

Fundamentals of Physics I

4

TAY Seng Chuan

Andreas DEWANTO

-

PC1221X

Fundamentals of Physics I

4

-

NG Siow Yee

-

PC1222

Fundamentals of Physics II

4

Ching Chee Leong

LAM Poh Fong Lydia

-

PC1222X

Fundamentals of Physics II

4

-

Andreas DEWANTO

-

PC1421

Physics for Life Sciences

4

WANG Zhisong

-

-

PC1431

Physics IE

4

TAN Meng Chwan
Lim Yen Kheng
YEO Ye

Nidhi SHARMA

-

PC1432

Physics IIE

4

Nidhi SHARMA

Paul LIM Hock Siah
TAN Meng Chwan
FENG Yuan Ping,

-

PC1433

Mechanics and Waves

4

ZHANG Chun
Shen Lei
(ESP)

-

-

FMS1204P

Conceptual Development of Physics

4

-

-

-

FMS1205P

Nanoworld and Synchrotron Radiation

4

-

Andrivo RUSYDI

-

FMS1206P

Energy Storage Devices: Clean Energy Solution For Tomorrow

4

Nidhi SHARMA

-

-

FMS1207P

The Scientific Method and How It Can Fail

4

-

Berthold Georg ENGLERT

-

FMS1208P

Experimental Physics

4

-

-

-

FMS1209P

Science of Solar and Thermal Energy

4

-

-

-

FMS1210P

Imaging Our World

4

Jens MARTIN

-

-

FMS1211P

Understanding the Materials Genome

4

-

-

-

FMS1212P

SYC: Simple Yet Complex

4

Christian MINIATURA

-

FMS1214P

Silk: fiber, known since antiquity, make a difference in our world

4

-

LIU Xiang Yang

-

 

Brief Description of Modules

Prerequisite & Preclusion(s): please refer to NUS Bulletin Online

 

COT2001 Computational Thinking for Scientists

 

PC1141 Introduction to Classical Mechanics

This module presents the fundamental principles of classical mechanics. It covers such topics as kinematics, Galilean transformation, Newton's laws of motion, dynamics of a particle with generalization to many particle systems, conservation laws, collisions, angular momentum and torque, motion of a rigid body, gravitation and planetary motion, static equilibrium, oscillatory motion and vibrational modes, waves, Doppler's effect and fluid mechanics. The module also has a practical component consisting of five experiments designed to enhance students' understanding of some of the concepts discussed in lectures. This module is targeted at science students who wish to acquire a working knowledge of mechanics, and is an essential for physics majors.

 

PC1142 Introduction to Thermodynamics and Optics

This module covers the fundamentals of two branches of physics: thermodynamics and optics. Its aim is to prepare students for a host of more advanced modules in these and related areas. Topics included in the part on thermodynamics are thermal processes and effects, the first and second laws, kinetic theory of gases, heat engines and entropy. The part on optics encompasses topics such as geometric optics, systems of lenses, optical instruments, interference, diffraction, grating and polarization. The module also has a practical component consisting of five experiments designed to enhance students' understanding of some of the concepts discussed in lectures. This module is targeted at science students who wish to acquire a working knowledge of thermodynamics and optics, and is an essential for physics majors.

 

PC1143 Introduction to Electricity & Magnetism

This module covers the fundamentals of electricity and magnetism: electric fields, electric flux and Gauss's law, electric potential; capacitance, dielectrics, current and resistance; DC circuits; magnetic fields, magnetic effect of currents, Ampere's law, electromagnetic induction; AC circuits; magnetism in matter; electromagnetic waves. The module also has a practical component consisting of five experiments designed to enhance students' understanding of some of the concepts discussed in lectures. This module is targeted at science students who wish to acquire a working knowledge in electricity and magnetism, and is an essential for physics majors.

 

PC1144 Introduction to Modern Physics

This module introduces the ideas of modern physics to students, with an emphasis on conceptual understanding. Topics covered are a) Einstein's theory of special relativity, including time dilation, length contraction, and his famous equation E=mc2, b) Quantum physics, where the observed phenomena of black body radiation, the photoelectric effect and Compton scattering, leading to the quantization of angular momentum and energy, atomic transitions and atomic spectra, c) Introduction to quantum mechanics, introducing the Heisenberg uncertainty principle, wave-mechanics and wave particle duality, and the use of wavefunctions in predicting the behaviour of particles trapped in potential wells, d) Nuclear physics, introducing radioactivity and decay processes, nuclear interaction and binding energy, fission and fusion, and e) Sub-atomic elementary particles and their classification. The module is targeted at science students who are interested in learning about the more recent developments in physics, and is an essential for physics majors.

 

PC1221 Fundamentals of Physics I

This module aims to bridge the gap between O level physics and 1st year university physics level. The syllabus covers: vectors, linear motion, velocity, acceleration, equations of kinematics, linear momentum, conservation of energy and linear momentum, forces, laws of motion and applications, work, energy, power, conservation laws, gravitation, circular motion, temperature, zeroth law, first law of thermodynamics, heat, heat capacity, ideal gas laws, thermal expansion of solids and liquids, work and heat transfer in thermodynamic processes.

 

PC1222 Fundamentals of Physics II

This module aims to bridge the gap between O level physics and 1st year university physics level. The module strives to comprehend and appreciate Nature through study of basic electromagnetic and optics phenomena. Major topics are: Coulomb's law, electric field and potential, capacitance, electric current, Ohm's law, magnetic field and flux, refraction, Snell's law, thin lenses, interference and diffraction of light waves, energy-mass relation, photo-electricity, and radioactivity.

 

PC1421 Physics for Life Sciences

This module provides a comprehensive and basic physics training within a single semester for first-year students from life sciences. It will cover mechanics, thermodynamics, electromagnetism, optics plus a few topics in atomic and nuclear physics. The specific contents have been chosen according to their relevance to life sciences as well as their importance in the conceptual framework of general physics.

 

PC1431 Physics IE

The module is designed to provide a clear and logical introduction to the concepts and principles of mechanics and thermodynamics, with illustrations based on applications to the real world. Topics covered include motion in one dimension; curvilinear motion; circular motion; relative motion; Newton's laws; friction; work and energy; conservative forces, conservation of energy; linear momentum and conservation, collisions; rotational kinematics; moment of inertia and torque; rotational dynamics; conservation of angular momentum; gravitational force, field and potential energy; planetary motion; temperature and the zeroth law, temperature scales; thermal expansion of solids and liquids; heat and internal energy, specific heat capacities, enthalpy and latent heat, work for ideal gases, first law of thermodynamics; equipartition of energy, mean free path; entropy and the second law, heat engines; entropy changes for reversible and irreversible processes. The module is targeted essentially at Engineering students.

 

PC1432 Physics IIE

This module introduces fundamental concepts of physics and is illustrated with many practical examples. Topics covered include a) Electricity and magnetism, where the basic concepts of electric and magnetic fields, forces on charged particles, electric potential, electromotive force, work and energy, are described. The properties of basic electrical circuits comprising resistors, inductors and capacitors are discussed, along with analysis of their transient and steady-state behaviour. Understanding the role of Maxwell's equations in electromagnetism is emphasized; b) Waves, introducing properties of waves, including geometric optics, propagation, interference and diffraction, and electromagnetic waves; and c) Quantum physics, where new physics concepts which led to the quantization of energy are introduced, leading to an explanation of atomic transitions, atomic spectra and the physical and the chemical properties of the atom. The uncertainty principle, wave-mechanics and wave particle duality concepts are covered, together with the use of wavefunctions in predicting the behaviour of trapped particles. The module is targeted essentially at Engineering students.

 

PC1433 Mechanics and Waves

The module consists of two parts. In Part 1, students will be introduced to the concepts and principles of mechanics of rigid bodies and their applications to solve practical problems. The topics to be covered include: force systems, equilibrium, kinematics of particles, kinetic of particles, work and energy, impulse and momentum, kinetics of system of particles, kinematics of rigid bodies, damped and undamped vibrations. In Part 2, students will be introduced to the fundamentals of wave mechanics. General description of wave propagation; types of waves: longitudinal, transverse and circular waves; speed of a travelling wave; propagation of energy and momentum; power and intensity; sound waves, oscillations of a string; light waves; superposition of waves; interference; standing waves, resonant waves; harmonics; resonance.

 

FMS1204P Conceptual Development of Physics

The theme of this module is on the conceptual development of physics. Several topics will be discussed e.g. (i) Conceptual development of the fundamental constituents of matter from the Greek atomists (Leucippus and Democritus) to the current M- theory. [Reference: The Elegant Universe by Brian Greene, W W Norton & Company (1999)] (ii) Conceptual development of quantum theory [Reference: The Fabric of the Cosmos by Brian Greene (2003)] (iii) Conceptual development of relativity [Reference: Albert Einstein: Opportunity and Perception by C N Yang, International Journal of Modern Physics A (Jan 2006)] (iv) Physical laws and symmetries in physics (v) Gauge field and its historical development. Core issues of physics.

 

FMS1205P Nanoworld and Synchrotron Radiation

The essence of nanoworld, i.e. nanoscience and technology, is the ability to understand and manipulate matter at the atomic level. Structures and electronic and magnetic structures behave differently when their dimensions are reduced to the range of between one and a few hundred nanometres (1 nanometre = 10-9 metre). They exhibit novel and much-improved mechanical, electrical, optical, chemical and biological properties, due entirely to their nanoscopic size. The nanoworld is therefore an exciting new realm that brings together the traditional disciplines of physics, chemistry, materials science, biology and engineering. To understand the nanoworld, we will introduce basic and advance spectroscopy and scattering synchrotron-based techniques such as x-ray absorption, x-ray magnetic circular dichroism, resonant soft x-ray scattering, xray photoemission spectroscopy, ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy, angular-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction. We will also introduce scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The aim of this module is to familiarise students with the main issues and techniques relevant to the nanometre scale. Questions that will be addressed include: What is the significance of the nanoscale? What measurement techniques allow us to examine such systems? How can we fabricate objects and devices on the nanometre scale? What are the examples of fascinating nanosystems? How will nanodevices and nanomaterials change our lives in the future? This module is targeted at students from different faculties who are interested in learning some general knowledge of nanoscience and nanotechnology.

 

FMS1206P Energy Storage Devices - State of the Art

Increased mechanization has simplified our daily lives significantly, but their high energy consumption nature has also raised concerns about depleting fossil fuels (currently the main source of energy). Research is being carried out worldwide to find alternate sources of energy. Solar and wind energy sound most promising but their intermittent nature is a major drawback. To counter this, significant R&D is being done to devise efficient energy storage devices. This module attempts to give an overview of alternate energy systems and highlight the importance of energy storage devices. Principle of operation, R&D and future trends, merits and limitations of various energy storage systems will be discussed. Pumped storage devices, fuel cells, batteries and their types, super capacitors and hydrogen storage will be focused upon.

 

FMS1207P The Scientific Method and How It Can Fail

By studying historical examples of great consequence, such as the development of the theory of heat or the birth of particle physics, students will learn about the scientific method. They will apply their new skill to projects that mimic a research situation. They will also examine famous cases of bad science, such as N rays and cold fusion, and learn how to notice cases of pseudoscience, such as the intelligence quotient or the SETI project.

 

FMS1208P Experimental Physics

Many major advances in physics have been driven by results of experiments which defied explanation by the then known laws of physics. The purpose of this seminar series is to introduce students to the importance of experimental physics. Fundamental principles of physics will explored through demonstration experiments. Working in small groups students will explore ways to improve or further such demonstrations.

 

FMS1209P Science of Solar and Thermal Energy

The world is facing energy crises because of over- consumption and over-reliance on fossil fuel. Solar and thermal energies are the alternatives. The purpose of this Seminar is to introduce freshman to the mysteries of solar energy and thermal energy. Amongst the questions that would be discussed are: what is the physics of radiation? How can solar and thermal energy be converted to electricity? How can solar and thermal energy be used smartly? What are the main scientific, technological, economical, and even political problems to be overcome for using solar and thermal energy?

 

FMS1210P Imaging Our World

In our daily life we are surrounded by images. In science, images play an important role as well. These images contain scientific information, but there is also an element of beauty: we gaze at images of far galaxies or at images of individual atoms. In this seminar we will explore various aspect of scientific imaging and address questions such as: What is it that we are actually looking at? How are these images produced? What are the limitations in imaging at small and large dimensions?

 

FMS1211P Understanding the Material Genome

In 2011, US White House announced the Materials Genome Initiative to develop an infrastructure to accelerate materials discovery and deployment. Rapid development is now taking place, not only in USA but also in many other countries. Successful implementation of the Materials Genome will impact materials research and development, similar to the Human Genome in medicine. In this module, students will have a chance to understand what the Materials Genome is and its impact, explore related issues such as materials properties, high throughput simulations, organization of information, databases, materials design based on materials informatics, as well as its social impact. Students will be exposed to this new paradigm of materials research and development and become prepared for further study in this new era.

 

FMS1212P SYC: Simple Yet Complex

Students often tend to think that if a system displays a complex behavior, it must be itself somehow complicated, difficult to describe. The aim of the module is to show, in a playful way, that this is not (always) the case, that really simple systems ranging from physics, meteorology, engineering, computer science, biology and economics, can have a rich, complex ? and unpredictable behavior. Many notions are at the heart of this module such as determinism versus predictability, chaos, the need for a statistical description, random walks, ergodicity, entropy, fractals, cellular automata, self-organized criticality, emergent behavior, etc.

FMS1214P SILK: FIBERS THAT MAKE A DIFFERENCE IN OUR WORLD

After long evolution, many biomaterials are of ultra-performance than the artificial ones. What makes these materials so different? In this module, we will explore why spider silk fibers are so strong from the point of view of structure, how the mechanical strength of fibers can be measured. The silkworm silk fibers will be used for comparison to the spider silk fibers. In addition, this module will demonstrate how fluorescent silk fibers are made from live silkworms. Students will be introduced to the fundamental concept of the hierarchal structure of soft materials and the mechanical performance in relation to the structure, and how to functionalize soft materials like silks.

 

H3 Programme (Coursework)

 

The 'A' Level curriculum was revamped by the Ministry of Education (MOE) in 2006 to better prepare students for the increasingly competitive and globalised world of today. The H3 programme was introduced to allow exceptional students to pursue a subject at a higher level which they have the passion and aptitude for. Subjects at the H3 level allow for a greater range of learning and research work.

One key feature of the NUS H3 programme is that these NUS H3 modules are taught by NUS lecturers. In addition, these are regular NUS modules which are also being offered to our own undergraduates.

The maximum number of H3 subjects allowed for each student is two.

Students who meet the minimum grade requirements will be granted advanced placement credits (APCs) if they are admitted into NUS to pursue an undergraduate course subsequently:

Institution that offers the H3 subjectMinimum grade requiredAdvanced Placement Credits (APC)
NUSPassCredits and Grade*
NTU, SMU or A*STARPassCredits

Note: NUS reserves the right to review the APC framework from time to time

*This is the original letter grade awarded by NUS, which may be converted to Satisfactory (S) grade during the University's official period of declaration, subject to Home Faculty's rules on Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory (S/U) Option. For more information on S/U, please refer here.

 

Module Code Module Title Lecture Days Lecture Time Slots Examination Date & Time
 PC1144Introduction to Modern PhysicsTuesday & Friday 1600-1800 hours 10 May 2018 (Thursday), 9am

Important Notes:

  1. Students will be assigned their tutorial and practical time slots by their lecturers during the 1st week of lectures.
  2. Students must attend all lectures, tutorial and practical sessions as well as take part in all continual assessments and Final Examinations. Even if students have intense CCA activities, they are still required to make time for the tutorial and practical sessions at their allocated time slots.
  3. Even or odd weeks refer to the instructional weeks and not calendar weeks. For example, Week 1 (the week of 15 Jan 2018) and Week 3 (the week of 29 Jan 2018) are referred to as odd weeks while Week 2 (the week of 22 Jan 2018) and Week 4 (the week of 5 Feb 2018) are even weeks and so on and so forth. For an overview of the NUS academic calendar on the instructional weeks starting from Jan 2018, please browse our Registrar’s Office website at the link below: http://www.nus.edu.sg/registrar/info/calendar/AY2017-2018.pdf

 

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