Latitude Definition Example Essay

Movement

People are always on the move, but this theme of geography is not just about people moving from one place to another in cars and airplanes. Movement also deals with how and why people travel from one place to another. Some people travel for career, others to be close to family, and some move to escape war or religious persecution. One example of movement was pioneers heading West on the Oregon Trail in hopes of finding cheap, fertile land in Oregon.

Geographers also study how products and resources are transported from one region or place to another. This includes manufactured products, crops, and oil. For example, a tractor-trailer delivering oranges from Florida to New York, or a boat delivering a shipment of coffee from Africa to Europe.

In addition, movement of ideas is also studied. With the advent of technology such as the phone and internet, ideas such as fashion, fads, music and philosophical ideologies are exchanged rapidly from all areas of the globe. Languages also evolve and change based on influence from outside ideas and other languages.

Latitude and longitude, coordinate system by means of which the position or location of any place on Earth’s surface can be determined and described.

Latitude is a measurement on a globe or map of location north or south of the Equator. Technically, there are different kinds of latitude—geocentric, astronomical, and geographic (or geodetic)—but there are only minor differences between them. In most common references, geocentric latitude is implied. Given in degrees, minutes, and seconds, geocentric latitude is the arc subtended by an angle at Earth’s centre and measured in a north-south plane poleward from the Equator. Thus, a point at 30°15′20″ N subtends an angle of 30°15′20″at the centre of the globe; similarly, the arc between the Equator and either geographic pole is 90° (one-fourth the circumference of the Earth, or 1/4 × 360°), and thus the greatest possible latitudes are 90° N and 90° S. As aids to indicate different latitudinal positions on maps or globes, equidistant circles are plotted and drawn parallel to the Equator and each other; they are known as parallels, or parallels of latitude.

In contrast, geographic latitude, which is the kind used in mapping, is calculated using a slightly different process. Because Earth is not a perfect sphere—the planet’s curvature is flatter at the poles—geographic latitude is the arc subtended by the equatorial plane and the normal line that can be drawn at a given point on Earth’s surface. (The normal line is perpendicular to a tangent line touching Earth’s curvature at that point on the surface.) Different methods are used to determine geographic latitude, as by taking angle-sights on certain polar stars or by measuring with a sextant the angle of the noon Sun above the horizon. The length of a degree of arc of latitude is approximately 111 km (69 miles), varying, because of the nonuniformity of Earth’s curvature, from 110.567 km (68.706 miles) at the Equator to 111.699 km (69.41 miles) at the poles. Geographic latitude is also given in degrees, minutes, and seconds.

Longitude is a measurement of location east or west of the prime meridian at Greenwich, the specially designated imaginary north-south line that passes through both geographic poles and Greenwich, London. Measured also in degrees, minutes, and seconds, longitude is the amount of arc created by drawing first a line from the Earth’s centre to the intersection of the Equator and the prime meridian and then another line from the Earth’s centre to any point elsewhere on the Equator. Longitude is measured 180° both east and west of the prime meridian. As aids to locate longitudinal positions on a globe or map, meridians are plotted and drawn from pole to pole where they meet. The distance per degree of longitude at the Equator is about 111.32 km (69.18 miles) and at the poles, 0.

The combination of meridians of longitude and parallels of latitude establishes a framework or grid by means of which exact positions can be determined in reference to the prime meridian and the Equator: a point described as 40° N, 30° W, for example, is located 40° of arc north of the Equator and 30° of arc west of the Greenwich meridian.

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